March 2018 Cover

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March 2018 Cover

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Mayor’s message

If you have visited our offices recently you may have noticed that Council has a new brand and signage which reflects th...

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Mayor’s message

If you have visited our offices recently you may have noticed that Council has a new brand and signage which reflects that brand. The full story behind this brand is in this issue of our newsletter.

We are also working with our community committees to bring a consistent look across our District – so you and our visitors will know they are in the Rangitikei. Each community will have signage that focuses on their unique identity, for example the gumboot in Taihape and the Bull in Bulls.

In February we welcomed 15 new residents to our District from Britain, Samoa and South Africa. No doubt there will be another citizenship ceremony in the next few months too. Rangitikei, like the rest of NZ is experiencing a housing shortage, where for the first time in many years, housing are selling very quickly and rentals are very hard to get. This is an issue that Council needs to consider as part of its future planning.

Over the last few months I have been advising that Council will be consulting on its Long Term Plan in March. This is the plan that outlines what Council will be doing over the next 10 years and, in a lot more detail, over the next 3 years. It gives everyone in Rangitikei the chance to have their say about what Council is planning and also what else you would like us to consider. Unfortunately, due to some extra detail required, we now have delayed this consultation process for a month. What this means is that instead of having the document ready for you for March, it will now be early April. We will be holding a number of public meetings right across this District during April, so you can come along and ask any questions of us – the details around the public meetings will be widely publicised.

Andy

 

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Every brand tells a story

Introducing Rangitikei District Council’s new brand When all is said and done, a Council’s role is to provide core servi...

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Every brand tells a story

Introducing Rangitikei District Council’s new brand

When all is said and done, a Council’s role is to provide core services to its ratepayers and residents; services that enable them to establish a home and live comfortably.

Rangitikei District Council wanted to refresh its brand to reflect the services it provides for the people living here.

It wanted an icon to base its branding on that was unique to the District and chose the Kowhai tree.

This was not an arbitrary choice. Rangitikei is renowned for having the most prolific kowhai stand in New Zealand. The Kowhai is a cultural and social icon, held dearly by many; it is an important and an often overlooked ecological feature of the District.

Athol Sanson, Council’s Parks & Reserves Team Leader, notes, “I have always thought that the Kowhai flower should be our regional flower, after all the greatest population of this tree in the country lives in the Northern Rangitikei.”

For its new brand Council took the Kowhai flower and stylized it as its main logo.

As well as representing the kowhai flower, the icon also illustrates ideas of nurture, direction, quality and foundation – all qualities that Council considered important to embody.

Good typography and colour are essential in giving a brand recognisable impact and Council wanted these elements to be consistent across everything it does.

Obviously the yellow of the kowhai chose itself as one of the primary brand colours. Sitting alongside this the contrast of the dark blue is an attention getter.

Because Council wanted its brand to reflect the work it does on behalf of its communities, it wanted a tag line that represented this work.

“Making this place home’ sums up what Council does for its residents and ratepayers. In fact it is a vision that Council is committing to.

You will see the new brand initially on Council stationery and vehicles and signage around the Council office in Marton and Taihape.

It will be extended to other areas of Council’s activity over time.

The second half of the branding structure will focus on the District. Council will develop a District brand as well as sub brands for its local communities. This development will take its cue from the new Council brand and will be based on discussions with local communities.

In the meantime, Council is proud to help you make Rangitikei home. We will do all we can to make living here the best experience possible.

Follow the link to Council’s website to view the video of our brand story.

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Rates Payment made by Automatic Payment/Online Banking

If you currently make rates payments using either an automatic payment or online banking, could you please make sure the...

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Rates Payment made by Automatic Payment/Online Banking

If you currently make rates payments using either an automatic payment or online banking, could you please make sure the amount you are paying is sufficient to cover your installment.

Rates do rise over the years and we note that some ratepayers have not changed the amount of their automatic payment to match this.

If you are not paying the correct amount you may be be charged a penalty. So, if you are unsure, ask one of our Customer Services staff and they will check that the amount you are paying is correct.

Thank you for your help with this. Our Customer Services team can be contacted by phone on 0800 422 522.

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Then Came the Gumboot

Taihape, the mountain town, becomes a world capital. Taihape. The mountain town is how it was referred to back in the 19...

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Then Came the Gumboot

Taihape, the mountain town, becomes a world capital.

Taihape. The mountain town is how it was referred to back in the 1960s and 70s when at its peak as a railway and transport hub for the surrounding farming community. Its railway station was a major stopover for passengers travelling on the main trunk line between Wellington and Auckland. The cup of tea, sandwich and pie on offer from the Refreshment Rooms was nourishment for body and soul.

But a downturn in the farming sector, the decreasing number of passenger trains and the electrification of the rail system from the1980s onwards was not so good for Taihape. The railway had played an important and significant role in the development and in the life of the town and without it times began to get tougher. The community lost some of its vitality and vision but they hunkered down, planning for better times.

Then came the gumboot. And the rest they say is history! Taihape almost ‘overnight’ became the ‘gumboot capital of the world’ and such status has brought with it an upturn in local commerce. Large numbers of visitors are attracted to the annual gumboot-throwing competition and this year the event took place on 3 March.

There is even a popular practice range set up in the town where locals, bus tours and travelling visitors can be seen practising their skills and measuring their distances as proudly as an Olympic shot putter or discus thrower. Stop by sometime, its worth watching the fun; better still, have a go yourself.

Yesterday

The Taihape region was originally inhabited by local Maori tribes who settled in the area well before the arrival of Europeans; descendants of these tribes still live in the area as do the descendants of the first Europeans. William Colenso is reported to be the first European to visit the area in 1845. It was another 40 years before the surveyor’s party for the Main Trunk Railway Line cut a rough track through the district. But a town was not founded until 1894 when a party of Europeans arrived from Canterbury in the South Island. The settlement was first called Hautapu after the local river, then Otaihape (“the place of Tai the Hunchback”), and finally Taihape. Before the railway arrived the bulk of farming produce (wool) had to be transported east by horse and bullock cart to be exported via the port at Napier.

Today

The second largest urban centre in the Rangitikei District with a population of 1,700 (2017), Taihape sits near the confluence of the Hautapu and Rangitikei rivers. At about 500 m (1500 ft) above sea level, it has sweeping vistas out over the Ruahine Ranges. Situated in a sheltered valley, it is surrounded by fertile high country which is used for sheep and deer farming. Its location close to the mountains, rivers and lakes and the North Islands major ski fields, has made it a service point for hunting and outdoor tourism. Its transportation network, incorporating an easy and fast set of deviations through the hills to Mangaweka in the south and Waiouru to the north, makes the town easily accessible from all quarters. The Taihape Road – once known as “Gentle Annie”- provides an efficient, sealed and time saving link into Hawke’s Bay.

Note 1: In 1999 Tranz Rail demolished the historic Taihape Railway Station but left the Refreshment Rooms standing on the former station platform and also left the old goods shed and locomotive depot compound at the south end of the rail yard – all a monument to former times.

Note 2: Taihape is the birthplace of rugby player Nehe Milner-Skudder – Manawatu Turbo, Hurricane and All Black.

Copy edited from Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia

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Check out The Lobby

Update on Marton’s Youth Zone. Since its opening in November 2017 “The Lobby” has taken off! Over the summer holidays it...

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Check out The Lobby

Update on Marton’s Youth Zone.

Since its opening in November 2017 “The Lobby” has taken off! Over the summer holidays it became increasingly busy with some days having nearly 30 young people through its doors all around 12 years old.

With a PlayStation 4, computers, board games, mini pool, courtyard, hang out area and free wifi it has everything youth want! Now in the centre of town it is a popular destination to hang out afterschool and has become the social hub for the young people of Marton.

We are open Monday – Friday 3pm – 5pm and welcome everyone to pop in and check out this awesome space.

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March 2018 Newsbriefs

Doing your bit to protect our drainage system Council collects and treats wastewater, to protect public health and the e...

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March 2018 Newsbriefs

Doing your bit to protect our drainage system

Council collects and treats wastewater, to protect public health and the environment.

You can help by not putting these down the drain:

What can’t I put down the drain? – Why not? – Where do they go?

  • Wet wipes – They clog drains – Rubbish
  • Nappies (either disposable or cloth) – They clog drains – Rubbish
  • Feminine hygiene products – They clog drains – Rubbish
  • Fats from cooking – It clogs drains – Rubbish
  • Engine oil – It’s hard to treat and harms the environment – Transfer station, in an oil container
  • Chemicals (in large quantities) – They’re hard to treat and harm the environment – Transfer station, if less than 20 litres

Thanks for helping us look after your town’s wastewater system.


Rubbish Being Illegally Dumped

Council has noticed  a significant increase in the amount of household rubbish being illegally dumped in our street rubbish bins and in public places across the District.

This activity is known as ‘fly tipping’ and it creates an unsightly mess in our town centers and scenic reserves and on our river banks and roadsides.

Anyone who is caught fly tipping can face a fine of $400 plus the cost of removing this rubbish.

If you do see anyone dumping rubbish illegally, please could you contact the Council. You can do this anonymously by either filling out a Fixit Form here or phone in on 0800 422522.

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Highlights from the Community Committees

During February Council’s Community Boards and Committees held their regular meetings, here are some highlights from tho...

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Highlights from the Community Committees

During February Council’s Community Boards and Committees held their regular meetings, here are some highlights from those meetings:


Turakina
The Turakina Community Committee have been active in place-making activities around the town. Place-making activities aim to increase the use of public spaces. An initial project was the installation of two picnic tables on the road reserve across from the petrol station. Future plans include painting of the bus shelter in the colours of the Turakina Tartan, updating signs about Turakina and the placement of seating around the town. The Committee is also seeking to have wider engagement with communities in the Committee’s area including – Koitiata, Whangaehu and Kauangaroa.


Hunterville
At its meeting on 19 February, the Hunterville Community Committee put their minds together for an alternative site for the proposed Dog Cemetery, unable to be located at 21 Milne Street. They are seeking suggestions from the community before progressing the idea. 2018 will see further native planting along the stream besides Queens Park and completion of the planting by the Plunket Rooms.


Marton
The Marton Community Committee meet regularly at 18 Humphrey Street, Marton. We endeavour to provide local informal links and points of contact to aid liaison with the Council. We also help to provide a local perspective on input into a wide range of topics to provide for an exchange of information, communication and assist with the Council’s consultative processes.


Ratana
Work continues on the draft plan to extend the Paa playground, which will include extending the basketball court from a half to a full court. The Board received an update on the water supply upgrade and the wastewater treatment plant upgrade. While a large drainage programme along Ratana Road has been completed, there is additional work to be scoped and added to this year’s work programme.

The centenary of the Divine Revelation being revealed to Tahupotiki Wiremu Ratana is on 8 November 2018. The Centennial Celebration Committee will give a presentation to the Board’s next meeting in April.


Taihape
A further place-making project in the town has been completed. The Board asked for investigation on getting Taihape recognised as a motorhome friendly town and for action over the neglected Tiriraukawa cemetery, officially closed fifty years ago. A ‘tear off map’ is to be produced highlighting things to do while visiting Taihape. The Board was updated on the process to get reduced speed limits on Dixon Way, Otaihape Valley Road and Rauma Road. Eva George, newly appointed manager for the Taihape Community Development Trust, introduced herself to the Board. Her first big project is organising Gumboot Day on 3 March.

The Board supported the Papakai Park development proposal from the Friends of Taihape Society.

Community Committees meet again in April.

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Forward Works – February / March

Broadway: Follett/Signal Streets - work being done includes replacing water reticulation, kerbs, crossing, and installin...

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Forward Works – February / March


Broadway: Follett/Signal Streets – work being done includes replacing water reticulation, kerbs, crossing, and installing ducting for Ultrafast Broadband (UFB) services. During construction the number of car parks will be reduced. There will be minor delays to traffic using Broadway. 

Photo: Work on Broadway in progress


Jeffersons Line: pavement work is being undertaken so expect minor delays.


Mangatipona Road: pavement work is being undertaken so expect minor delays.


Galpins Road: work being done includes pavement work so expect minor delays.

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