October 2017 Cover

READ ARTICLE

October 2017 Cover

Comments/Questions

0 Comments

Form Icon Comment/Question

Please fill in the below details to submit your comment/question...

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *

Mayor’s Message

Well finally we have a new government with a Labour, Greens and NZ First coalition, we now have to build relationships w...

READ ARTICLE

Mayor’s Message

Well finally we have a new government with a Labour, Greens and NZ First coalition, we now have to build relationships with a new set of Ministers and with that comes new opportunities.

Recently I was given the honour of investing a Queens Service Medal (QSM) to Mrs Blackmore a kuia of Parewahawaha marae at Bulls. Normally this honour is bestowed by either the Queen or the Governor General of New Zealand I was asked to do this because Mrs Blackmore was unwell. With the Whanau present we were able to do this at Whanganui hospital. Mrs Blackmore has now passed on and our thoughts go out to her whanau and the marae.

As we move into the spring and summer we look forward to the numerous events that the Rangitikei is well known for. Our stunning district continues to attract new residents, we seem to be holding citizenship ceremonies every couple of months and the next one has a record of 30 new residents – bring it on, we are on a roll!

Council is currently holding meetings looking at a draft long term plan for the District which governs how we will operate and rate over the next few years. We expect to release a draft Plan early in the New Year, for consultation.

Rangitikei District Council was one of only about 20 councils who signed up to take part in the Local Government Excellence Programme. An assessment was undertaken by two independent assessors against 90+ performance indicators/measures across 4 key areas:

1. Governance, Leadership and Strategy
2. Financial Decision-making and Transparency
3. Service Delivery and Asset Management
4. Communications and Engaging with the Public and Business

The Assessment confirms we are performing to a good level (i.e. competently) across 3 of the 4 key areas, and performing at a higher level in the area of Financial Decision-making and Transparency with an overall rating of “BB”.

The assessors noted in their overview that “Rangitikei District Council has met the challenge of being a small but geographically dispersed community through its well-considered strategies, careful financial management and a commitment to service improvement. It recognises that it must continue to develop options for cost-effective shared services and improve its capital expenditure and project delivery capability, and it is well placed for further progress.”

This is a good result for us, but equally we have lessons to be learned.

Within the past few weeks the JBS Dudding Charitable Trust met to allocate grants across the Rangitikei. Our proposed Bulls Community Centre was granted funding of $200,000 – which is a fantastic step forward for this project. Also $50,000 was allocated to the project to upgrade the Marton skateboard park. There were 80 applications made for funding, with 59 applicants receiving a grant. Grants distributed totalled $610,642.00 – which is a fantastic amount to go into our District.

Comments/Questions

0 Comments

Form Icon Comment/Question

Please fill in the below details to submit your comment/question...

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *

Introducing Ellen Webb-Moore

Ellen started with the Council as its Policy Analyst in November 2016, after completing a double degree with a Bachelor...

READ ARTICLE

Introducing Ellen Webb-Moore

Ellen started with the Council as its Policy Analyst in November 2016, after completing a double degree with a Bachelor of Laws and a Bachelor of Arts over five years at the University of Otago.

Her home town is Palmerston North so she was keen to find work close by.

Ellen said “My interest in Resource Management and the Policy area drew me towards the role. It was a new graduate role in Council, so I saw it as a great first step into a career in an area I sparked an interest in in my time at University. I have had to become familiar with what Council does and I’m surprised at the huge variety of things it’s involved with.”

Ellen enjoys consents planning and the variety in her role, including dealing with the public with their planning enquiries. As part of the Strategy and Policy team currently Ellen assists with consultation for new bylaws and shares her time between the policy and planning departments. She is Council’s Duty Planner for planning enquiries as well as processes resource consents. She is also involved in some community aspects of Council and takes minutes at some community committee meetings around the district.

Ellen said “One of the first tasks in the policy part of my new role was implementing the Residents and Stakeholder survey, I was thrown in the deep end and my statistics knowledge was certainly tested as the practicality of the survey was something I had never done before. It was a huge learning curve!”

Ellen enjoys horse riding and equestrian on the weekends.

Ellen said “Part of my incentive for coming back home was to be able to do equestrian again. I love the rural lifestyle, being a horsey person I’m lucky to have my own horse and will be doing some competitions this summer. You will often see me at Marton Farmlands! And living at home certainly helps me to be able to pay off my student loan!”

Comments/Questions

0 Comments

Form Icon Comment/Question

Please fill in the below details to submit your comment/question...

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *

Parks and Reserves Highlights by Athol Sanson

Although we have seen some warmer temperatures the continued rainfall has made gardening and lawn mowing a constant batt...

READ ARTICLE

Parks and Reserves Highlights by Athol Sanson

Although we have seen some warmer temperatures the continued rainfall has made gardening and lawn mowing a constant battle for the team. I believe we can all say that we are looking forward to the summer months.

For me we have had one major highlight in the parks this month, and that is seeing 500 ecosourced plants being planted by local school children at Memorial Park in Taihape. This planting had been planned for 18 months with seed being collected from a number of species in March/April 2016.

The planting was organised by the Treasured Natural Environment Group in conjunction with Conservation week 2017. Our thanks go out to everyone that has been involved in making this planting happen.

The children of Mataroa School had a great morning in this incredible Park and our thanks go out to the children and parents for making this day so rewarding for everyone involved.

I thought I would highlight why we have chosen ecosoursing as our preferred method of plant production and supply.


What is ecosourcing?

It is using native plants grown from locally grown seeds. Ecosourced plants help to preserve the ecological distinctiveness of an area, and ecosourced plants fare better and are adapted to survive in the local conditions.
Native plants are those occurring naturally in New Zealand (i.e.not introduced accidentally or deliberately by humans).


Why ecosource?

Ecosourcing is often used in restoration projects because locally sourced plants are thought to be more likely to survive than those from further away. This is because species are often better adapted to local conditions. For example, if you plant an Auckland sourced plant in Taihape this plant may not show the frost resistant properties of the same Taihape plant.

If ecosourcing principles are not followed then we may see gene pools mixed and could lead to the possible hybridism of a species.

For environmentally sensitive areas the Rangitikei District Council has adopted ecosourcing as its main method for plant supply. We have a number of key seed collection areas though out the region, seeds collected in 2017 were harvested from Memorial Park Taihape, Marton B & C dams and Koitiata.

Our guidelines for seed collecting:

  • Seed is to be harvested from naturally occurring native species
  • Seed is to be collected off 10 plus plants to maintain biodiversity
  • Seed is to be collected within 20 km of the planting site
  • Seed is to be labelled with date collected, species, GPS location and number collected.

The plants chosen for planting were mostly understory plants due to the forest having a mature canopy. The plants have to be carefully placed to ensure the correct plant location for that species.

The following species were planted:

Lophomytus obcordata: A small upright shrub that is common in the Taihape area. Has large red berries during April, berries contain 100’s of seeds.

Myrsine divaricata: A small upright tree with divaricating branches. Small berries are hidden in the tree and contain 4 seeds.

Sophora godleyii: The Rangitikei Kowhai, can grow to a height of 15m. Seeds are produced in long capsules and will stay on the tree for many months.

Melicytus ramiflorus: Our common whitewood or Mahoe produces deep purple fruit containing 50 plus seeds

Hoheria sextulosa: Our native lacebark, produces seeds for a short period of time due to weevil damage.
Coprosma rhamnoides: Small growing divaricating shrub, fruit are black – red producing 2 seeds per berry.

I am hoping that though the Treasured Natural Environment Group all plantings in the Rangitikei District in the future could be ecosourced. It is a simple process and all that is needed is coordination between all members of this group. This would be a step forward in the long term environmental health of our region.

Comments/Questions

0 Comments

Form Icon Comment/Question

Please fill in the below details to submit your comment/question...

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *

Reducing and reusing our Rubbish

Much of the rubbish we create across the District can be reused and does not not have to go into expensive and ugly land...

READ ARTICLE

Reducing and reusing our Rubbish

Much of the rubbish we create across the District can be reused and does not not have to go into expensive and ugly landfills (covered in rubbish dumps).

A recent survey by Council showed that 39% of the rubbish going into landfills across the District was made up of organic kitchen waste. Plastics made up 22% of the rubbish and paper 17%. All these ‘waste’ products can be reused and Council would like you to consider disposing of this waste in the following ways.


Organic kitchen waste should be recycled into compost, which can then be reused around your garden. There are some relatively cheap options to make compost bins and this guide put out by Tui Garden shows how easy it is here.

Another alternative is a worm farm which is also a great way to get rid of kitchen scraps. Places like Mitre 10 and Bunnings have worm farm kits with helpful set=up guides to get you started.


Plastics, cans and tins, paper and cardboard can all be recycled for free at Council’s Waste Transfer Stations. Check out the locations of the Waste Transfer Stations here: https://www.rangitikei.govt.nz/services/rubbish-recycling


The Reuse shop at the Marton Transfer Station will take other items you think are too good to throw away. These will be resold at a small cost so others can make use of them. Some items like electrical appliances are not accepted, our attendant at the Transfer Station Shop will be able to give you more information about these.

By making use of composting, recycling and the Marton Reuse Shop you will end up saving space in your refuse bins or bags, you will save money by not having to buy as many bags and you will save space at our landfills making them last longer.
Rethink.Reuse. Recycle.

 

Comments/Questions

2 Comments

  1. Robyn Wills

    Great to read that Marton has a Reuse Shop! Is the Council looking at providing this option to other Waste Transfer Station sites e.g. Taihape?

    Reply

Form Icon Comment/Question

Please fill in the below details to submit your comment/question...

  1. Rangitikei DC says:

    Hi Robyn - the Marton Reuse shop is a trail, we will see how successful it is and then consider rolling out in other areas.

  2. Robyn Wills says:

    Great to read that Marton has a Reuse Shop! Is the Council looking at providing this option to other Waste Transfer Station sites e.g. Taihape?

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *

What are our priority areas for fixing earthquake-prone buildings?

Take part in our Consultation Council needs to make a list of earthquake-prone buildings in the District. Earthquake-pro...

READ ARTICLE

What are our priority areas for fixing earthquake-prone buildings?

Take part in our Consultation

Council needs to make a list of earthquake-prone buildings in the District. Earthquake-prone building are those considered to be in danger of sustaining serious damage in a large earthquake.

Government requires all buildings in the District to be certified safe or unsafe. Of course it is a big job to do all these at once so Council is proposing that buildings in certain areas be checked first.

Bulls, Marton, Hunterville and Taihape have the most pedestrian and vehicle traffic in the District so Council is suggesting that buildings in these areas be given priority for checking.

Buildings considered to be at risk in an earthquake have to be identified within 2.5 years. Once identified as a risk building the owners will receve an earthquake-prone building notice from Council and will then have 7.5 years to either fix the building to required standards or demolish it.

Council would like to know if you think it has correctly identified the priority areas for this earthquake risk assessment and if you think there are other parts of the district that should be added to the priority list.

There are two ways you can do this.

You can make a written submissions up until noon Tuesday 7 November 2017. Full details on how to do this can be found on our website here.

The second way is to fill in the survey below.

Let’s work together to make the District’s buildings as safe as possible and to retain as much of our historic architure as we can.

What do you think?

Poll Icon Please fill in the survey

What do you think?

Comments/Questions

0 Comments

Form Icon Comment/Question

Please fill in the below details to submit your comment/question...

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *

Mangaweka – nothing fake about this place!

It was one of the breath-taking sights back in the sixties and beyond. A giant steam locomotive held up stark against th...

READ ARTICLE

Mangaweka – nothing fake about this place!

It was one of the breath-taking sights back in the sixties and beyond. A giant steam locomotive held up stark against the skyline by the steel girders of the Mangaweka Viaduct. It’s plume of smoke proudly streaming out behind it like a signature of the age.

Of course ages come and ages go and the rumble of the diesel locomotive, pushing itself through the sky high above the main road for all travellers to see, soon replaced the smoke.

The viaduct was an engineering feat in itself and formed an integral part of the North Island Main Trunk Line which opened in 1909.

Designed by Public Works Department engineer Peter Hay, the Mangaweka Viaduct was 300 metres long and 50 metres high – at the time the longest in New Zealand. It was one of 20 viaducts Hay designed for the central section of the main trunk line between Mangaweka and Tauramanui.

A new deviation of the main trunk line was opened in 1981 between Mangaweka and Utiku. This bypassed the geologically unstable land of the original route and three new concrete viaducts replaced the high-maintenance steel ones – two across the Rngitikei River and one across the Kawhatau River.

The new South Rangitikei Viaduct is the now the second longest in New Zealand at 315 metres and 73 metres high. It was the first viaduct in the world to use energy-absorbing dampers in the foundations. In the event of an earthquake, the piers will rock from side to side rather than collapse.

The North Rangitikei viaduct, at 81 metres high, is the highest on the main trunk line. See some views of the new viaducts.


Pioneering and innovative village

The remains of the original Managweka Viaduct are still visible for all travellers on State Highway One to see. They are a fading testament to a progressive and pioneering era; an icon of the spirit that helped shaped the region and the Mangaweka village that was originally established in the mid 1890s in anticipation of the arrival of the main trunk line.

In fact all the workers who built the 20 viaducts on this central section of the railway were housed in Mangaweka, contributing to the energetic, pioneering community that was centred initially on agriculture and the railway. Its location on the main road between Wellington and Auckland also made it an ideal stop off for weary travellers.

Originally called Three Log Whare, Mangaweka is located 21 kms south of Taihape and 63 km north of Bulls with a population just under 200 people.

A moment of glory bathed the town in 1936 when a local horse, Wotan, won the famed Melbourne Cup.

And local community initiative and individual courage and ingenuity came to the fore when, in the late 1970s, State Highway One bypassed the centre of the town. This initially left the main street a virtual ghost town.

But today it stands as an historic icon, preserving the visual memories of the way things were. The buildings now house art galleries and cafes as the locals focus their creative energies and skills to breath life into the town and build its reputation as a vibrant arts centre. Tourists and local visitors stop for photographs, enjoy a coffee and browse the gift and flourishing art galleries.

NZ Artist Robin White famously depicted the village in her iconic “Mangaweka” painting which now hangs in Te Papa.

Photographer/artist Richard Aslett also lives and works in Mangaweka.


To do and to see

With the Rangitikei River running adjacent to the village, Managweka is a popular centre for rafting, kayaking, fishing, bungy jumping, flying fox and swimming. Local tour and adventure companies help visitors make the most of these attractions. Here’s a couple to check out.

You’ll find all the services and adventures on offer from the Mangaweka Adventure company here.

Sitting on the side of SH1 is the very famous DC3 aircraft. This houses the storied history of the great plane’s integral role in New Zealand’s aviation development. It is also a café and a tour guide base.

Department of Conservation scenic walks in the area include a stroll through tunnels on the former route of the main trunk line.


Nothing fake about this festival

Mangaweka’s most infamous son is one Karl Sim (aka Carl Feodor Goldie) who made a name for himself forging artists such as Frances Hodgkins, Colin McCahon and Charles F Goldie. He was eventually arrested for this endeavour.

Sim was guest of honor at the inaugural ‘Mangaweka Fakes & Forgeries Festival’ in 2007 in his birth town. He appeared again as prize presenter in 2011. Sim died in 2013 but the festival continues and this year takes place on Saturday 4 November in Mangaweka.

Information about this years Fakes and Forgeries Festival here.


Mangaweka bucks the urban trend and is an inspiring example of the innovative and quirky communities that make up the Rangitikei District. Make this place home.

Hear Michael and Richard talk about how they came to live in Mangaweka.


 

Let us know if you will be coming...

Poll Icon Hope to see you there

Let us know if you will be coming...

Loading

Are you coming to the Fakes and Forgeries Festival at Mangaweka on Saturday 4 November?

Thank you for voting
You have already voted on this poll!
Please select an option!

Comments/Questions

0 Comments

Form Icon Comment/Question

Please fill in the below details to submit your comment/question...

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *

Make sure you Ride the Bus!

Horizons Regional Council are responsible for providing bus services and the Rangitikei District is fortunate to have a...

READ ARTICLE

Make sure you Ride the Bus!

Horizons Regional Council are responsible for providing bus services and the Rangitikei District is fortunate to have a bus service linking our communities and help us access other neighbouring cities.

To ensure we keep a bus service going we need to keep using these buses. Some reasons passengers use the bus are:

  • accessing medical appointments (health, dentist, eye examinations, osteopathic etc)
  • visiting family in hospital
  • accessing shops which aren’t available in our home towns or stores with a broader range
  • going to the movies, or just escaping for the day and getting away from day to day living.

Please if you want our bus service to continue “Ride the Bus”! For timetable and bus service information please visit Horizons website.

Comments/Questions

0 Comments

Form Icon Comment/Question

Please fill in the below details to submit your comment/question...

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *

October Newsbriefs

Rating Briefs Questions on Rates Rebates? One of our staff will be available to talk to if you have any questions about...

READ ARTICLE

October Newsbriefs


Rating Briefs

Questions on Rates Rebates?
One of our staff will be available to talk to if you have any questions about rates rebates, Marilyn will be at the Taihape Council building on Tuesday 14 November, Bulls Library on Wednesday 15 November and Marton Library on Thursday 16 November. Members of the public are welcome to come and speak to Marilyn about rates rebates.

Rangitikei Rating Values Updated
Quotable Values (QV) have recently completed its three yearly rating value assessment across properties in the Rangitikei District. This assessment is based on the market value of a property (excluding chattels) and are used as one factor for Council to allocate rates.
Property owners should have received their updated values in the mail, or will receive them soon. If you don’t agree with your new rating value you are able to make an objection to QV by phoning them on 0800 787 284 or completing their objection form on their website. If you have any questions about rating valuations or objecting to the revised valuation, check out the frequently asked questions at ratingvalues.co.nz.

Rates Due – Instalment Two
To avoid a penalty your rates need to be paid by Monday 20 November 2017.


Temporary Toilets Installed at Mangaweka Campground

This week a new public toilet facility was installed at the Mangaweka campground. Cube Innovations have supplied the pre-fab building which provides 4 toilets and 2 showers.

The facility has been put on its current site until the location of the new Mangaweka bridge has been decided then a permanent structure will be put in place.


Forward Works – October/November

Ratana – Commissioning of the water plant will start once the redevelopment of the bore is complete, which is expected to be in November. Acquisition of land is still to be commenced.

Taihape watermain renewal – work is underway

Broadway Marton watermain renewal – work underway

Hammond St – stormwater upgrade completion date mid October

Mangaweka watermain renewals – projects awarded

Sewer relining – scheduled to start in Marton in October

Broadway, Marton this work includes replacing watermains, kerb and channel, resurfacing the footpath and installing ducting for Ultra Fast Broadband services. During construction there will be less car parking available and traffic will be slowed to a single lane with STOP/GO operations in place.


Comments/Questions

0 Comments

Form Icon Comment/Question

Please fill in the below details to submit your comment/question...

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *