May 2018 Cover

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May 2018 Cover

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Take a peek behind the scenes at Taihape Swim Centre

The pools’ filtration and heating systems have been replaced, ready for the start of the 2018 summer swim season and pai...

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Take a peek behind the scenes at Taihape Swim Centre

The pools’ filtration and heating systems have been replaced, ready for the start of the 2018 summer swim season and painting is about to begin on the pool and surrounds.

Trevor Nicholls says he has “big plans” for the centre and is currently exploring community funding and partnership options for an outside play and picnic area, as well as more indoor water play options for preschool children.

Trevor says a community Gala Day is planned for the opening of the summer season at the end of September, which will be a month earlier this year to coincide with the School holidays.

Take a quick tour with Trevor and see where Rangitikei District Council’s has invested in the pool’s infrastructure.

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“We’re happy with what Council is proposing– now just get on and do it”

First of all, thank you to all those that attended one of the public consultation meetings. The overriding theme I heard...

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“We’re happy with what Council is proposing– now just get on and do it”

First of all, thank you to all those that attended one of the public consultation meetings.

The overriding theme I heard very clearly on the Long Term Plan consultation process was that you had no major gripes with us and that you just want us to get on and get the work done.

Recycling
There were a number of positive comments about council looking to engage in recycling which was pleasing.

Roading
In rural areas we heard that while you recognise the need for supportive and sustainable towns, roading is your number one concern. Also discussed was the impact impending forestry logging would have on roading in rural districts. Corrugations on some of the back roads is another common theme so we have some work to do in that area as well.

New centres
The feedback was that we’ve talked about this for a long time – we’re happy with the process – just get on and do it. I’m happy to announce that in Bulls we’re looking to go out for tender for construction at the end of this month so finally after 3 years of preparatory work we’re on the road to building something.

LTP process
Last week we listened to verbal submissions. After this, councillors will start preparing reports around the impact of decisions. The LTP will be imbedded before the end of June.

Roadworks in Marton on Broadway
We accept there was a holdup but we’re now back on track after discussions with contractor. We’ve met with businesses along Broadway that were affected, and we apologise for the seeming lack of progress, but it does look to be on track again now.

The east side is now being worked on- we think this work will be completed by the end of May.

Wellington meeting with Ministers
I spent a few days in Wellington talking to various Ministers – in particular Minister Shane Jones and Minister of Defence the Hon Ron Marks.

Hon Shane Jones holds a number of important portfolios including Infrastructure, Forestry, and Regional Economic Development.

He holds the purse strings for 1 Billion dollars of infrastructure spend for the Government and he seems incredibly supportive of the Rangitikei. He wants the Government to invest money in our district which is great. Council will need some assistance in preparing information for him, but we wait with expectation that the cheque will follow.

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Rangitikei Ratepayers – apply before 30 June for your Rates Rebate

Applications for rates rebates for the July 2017 to June 2018 rating year close on 30 June. Applications will be based o...

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Rangitikei Ratepayers – apply before 30 June for your Rates Rebate

Applications for rates rebates for the July 2017 to June 2018 rating year close on 30 June. Applications will be based on your income from 01 April 2016 to March 2017.

If you receive the New Zealand Superannuation and have been receiving the same pension for the complete year you do not need to request an income statement from WINZ but you still need to fill in the rates rebate application form.

If your pension has changed or you receive any other benefit you will will need to get a certificate of earnings.

For further information and a link to the Department of Internal Affairs application form, follow this link on Council’s website here.

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Bulls’ former jail is worth a visit

I don’t know how many times I’ve strolled through Bulls and walked straight past one of our towns more significant histo...

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Bulls’ former jail is worth a visit

I don’t know how many times I’ve strolled through Bulls and walked straight past one of our towns more significant historical buildings.

Directly behind Scully’s Giftshop is the region’s first pokey. It’s a Category 2 listed 1884 building that’s typical of the two-cell lock-ups constructed in small towns throughout New Zealand at that time.

The lockup was originally behind the Bulls Police Station across the road but has now been relocated to the rear of the 1882 courthouse building, now leased to Scully’s Gift Shop.

The lockup would contain prisoners while they waited to go before the judge at the courthouse over the road. The doors to the lockup are made of solid vertical timber slabs with hand-forged iron hinges and nails. The doors are 3 inches thick and still show kick marks and scratches from prisoners held in the cells 130 years ago.

Complete with replica handcuffs and stocks out the front it’s a must-have photo stop for any self-respecting tourist or lover of NZ pioneering history. If it’s locked when you visit, ask at Scully’s for the key.

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Hundreds flock to Museums in District

As part of Rangitikei District Heritage Weekend 2018 museums in Bulls, Marton, Mangaweka, Hunterville and Taihape were o...

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Hundreds flock to Museums in District

As part of Rangitikei District Heritage Weekend 2018 museums in Bulls, Marton, Mangaweka, Hunterville and Taihape were open to the public on 19th and 20th of May.

Each museum focused on bringing to life a character from the past. In Bulls, it was Dr Frederick Waton.

Images are of Bulls Museum, Hunterville and District’s Settlers Museum and items from Dr Watson’s medical kit.

Caroline Taylor from Marton said “We thoroughly enjoyed Our Marton Heritage House visit, loved how it was so interactive and we could walk into the rooms and not have to stand in the door ways in front of ropes! So Many fabulous memories & photos to view.

Loved the archives as well and found old articles with family names in the papers (my grandfather was jack Dawson (Mona Lisa – Queen Anne days) and my dads peter Crawford (mcverry Crawford) lots of fun reading!”

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Purple poppies sold as far afield as Canada

Bulls Museum has been selling purple poppies to commemorate the animals that served in WW1. At the request of a former s...

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Purple poppies sold as far afield as Canada

Bulls Museum has been selling purple poppies to commemorate the animals that served in WW1.

At the request of a former soldier who had served in Afghanistan, six poppies were sent to him in Canada. Proceeds from the sale of these knitted poppies help to raise much-needed funds for Bulls Museum.

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Captain Cook Pioneer Cottage in Marton, Rangitikei

I had the pleasure recently of viewing Captain Cook’s Pioneer Cottage in Marton, Rangitikei. It’s a category 2 protected...

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Captain Cook Pioneer Cottage in Marton, Rangitikei

I had the pleasure recently of viewing Captain Cook’s Pioneer Cottage in Marton, Rangitikei. It’s a category 2 protected building that is easily one of the most accessible historic homes I’ve ever had the privilege to step inside.

Located right in the heart of Marton township, it’s open for viewings on request, and is situated amongst a group of historic buildings in the Marton Historic Village including an old stable block and jail.

Special thanks to Marton District Historical Society member Pat Simpson for kindly showing me through and patiently waiting while I exclaimed over and photographed absolutely everything!

Marton is known for its historical buildings and its active Historical Society is working to preserve buildings, items and documents in the region. Captain Cook’s cottage is testament to the passion and determination of this group in both preserving local history and bringing it alive to its community.

The attached photos were taken on my visit, but I have borrowed heavily from the Historic Places Trust in this article with regard to facts and timelines.

The cottage was originally a homestead named ‘Glenfield’ that was built for Scottish farmer Neil Small and his wife Margaret Sutherland around 1869. Glenfield was situated in the upper reaches of the Tutaenui District, located 5 miles out of Marton.

In 1970 the cottage was donated to the Marton Historical Society by its then owner, local farmer Robert (Bob) Smith. An increasing number of items had been donated to the Society, and the acquisition of the cottage prompted the decision to establish a museum, which would allow them to be displayed in an appropriate manner.

At the time the cottage was donated, it had not been in use for six years and was in need of renovation. Members of the Marton community actively assisted in this process, donating their time and effort to restore the cottage. All rooms that had been added to the cottage since its original construction in 1869 were removed, as it was believed that this would restore the authenticity of the house.

In 1973 the cottage was moved to its present site on the grounds of the Retired Services Association and Citizens Memorial Hall. The site was supplied free of charge by the then Marton Borough Council (managed now by Rangitikei District Council). A new verandah roof was added to the cottage in 1974 and a picket fence was built around the exterior. The cottage then underwent further work to make it suitable for displaying exhibits.

On 1 April 1978 the cottage was officially opened as the ‘Captain Cook Pioneer Memorial Cottage’. The name reflects the connection of the Marton township’s own name to Captain Cook, who was born in Marton, Cleveland.

Furnished with the items donated by the people of Marton, the cottage is arranged to appear as if a nineteenth century family was still in residence. The nursery, for instance, is furnished with a variety of pieces, including a cot, books, dolls, baby clothes and christening gowns. At ground level, the one and a half storey house features a room at the entrance to the museum, a kitchen and pantry, a parlour, and a bedroom.

The upper level has another bedroom and a nursery. Pictures of various early settlers from Marton are displayed throughout the cottage along with other items of relevance to the town’s history.

Through exhibiting personal items donated by local families, the Captain Cook Pioneer Memorial Cottage is a monument to the history of people in Marton. The museum holds strong significance because it links the local history of the township with the people of Marton who have been actively involved in the museum’s inception and formation.

The cottage has been well restored by the people of Marton and includes many exhibits that reflect a form of colonial lifestyle typical not only of the Marton area, but New Zealand in general. Cooks Cottage is a valuable educational resource and is able to provide viewers with a glimpse of a type of colonial lifestyle associated with nineteenth century settlement.

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How was Bulls named?

Bulls was named after Mr James Bull, who established a store in town, with hotel attached in 1859. He was born in Chelse...

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How was Bulls named?

Bulls was named after Mr James Bull, who established a store in town, with hotel attached in 1859. He was born in Chelsea, London in 1831. He sailed to New Zealand on the Indian Queen arriving in Wellington in 1857.

In 1858 James Bull went to Scott’s Ferry to build a house for Thomas Scott and his wife. While he was there he met the Scott’s daughter, Christina, and they married in June 1859.

In 1863 James became the Postmaster. He was also appointed Justice of the Peace and became involved with the School Committee, the Rangitikei Highway Board and the Rangitikei County Council.

With such a thriving establishment it soon became common for people to say they were “going to Bull’s”.

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Planned Works

The major works planning during May / June are: Broadway – Follett/Signal Streets: work being done includes replacing wa...

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Planned Works

The major works planning during May / June are:


Broadway – Follett/Signal Streets: work being done includes replacing water reticulation; kerbs, crossing, and installing ducting for Ultrafast Broadband Services (UFB) on the east side. During construction the number of car parks will be reduced. There will be minor delays to traffic using Broadway. All businesses remain open during this work.


Jeffersons Line: pavement work is being done so expect minor delays.


Turakina Valley Road (south of Mangatipona Road): earthworks is being undertaken as part of road improvements.

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