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September 2017 Cover

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September 2017 Cover

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Mayor Andy Watson on Marton’s Water

Marton’s water supply has been a feature in the media over the last few weeks, so I want to provide some information so...

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Mayor Andy Watson on Marton’s Water

Marton’s water supply has been a feature in the media over the last few weeks, so I want to provide some information so residents better understand what the issues are, what Council is doing to address them and what residents can do to assist.

Marton has experienced problems with its drinking water supply for as long as there has been a reticulated supply in place – which is at least 130 years. Over the years the water used for Marton has been relatively high in iron and manganese, but the level of treatment available hasn’t, until recently, been sufficient to fully remove these from the treated drinking water. The result is that this iron and manganese, which discolours the water, has slowly built up over decades on the inside of the water pipes, with the oldest pipes most affected. This discolouration, which is more evident in some areas of Marton, does not make the water unsafe to drink, but its appearance makes the water unappealing. The only way of completely removing this residual is pipe replacement, but controlling water pressure and regular flushing does help minimise the problem. There is a regular flushing programme in place.

Rangitikei District Council has been progressively upgrading the Marton water supply, with around $9 million spent in the last 5-6 years. Most of this has been on a major upgrade of the Marton water treatment plant on Tutaenui Road. There has also been a regular programme of replacing older water pipes as they reach the end of their useful life. These older concrete (AC) pipes are progressively being replaced with PVC pipes, and AC pipes now make up less than 25% of the water network. Council will continue the pipe replacement programme until all older pipes have been replaced. Council is currently preparing the next long term plan (10 year LTP), and we will be reviewing the speed of the pipe replacement programme to see if we can complete this expensive work sooner.

Occasionally, one of these older pipes will break due to a manufacturing flaw. When this happens the residual iron and manganese coating the inside of the pipe is dislodged and travels around the network as a ‘pulse’ of dirty water. Due to the layout of the water reticulation network, it’s not always possible to accurately pinpoint where this discoloured water will go. When pipe breakages occur, like the one in the Kensington Road area in August, Council staff respond immediately to replace the broken pipe and undertake an intensive flushing programme to remove as much of the discoloured water as possible. Notifications are also made to local businesses and residents, and Council relies on calls from affected properties to help target the areas needing flushing. Residents and businesses can help speed up this flushing process – by turning on outside (cold) taps for at least 15 minutes and letting the water run until it is clear.

We also want to hear from you at any time you notice a change in the quality of your water (e.g. discolouration, taste/odour). Please ring the Council immediately and let our staff know, we operate a call centre 24 hours a day, 7 days a week. If we don’t know there is an issue we can’t do anything about it – so ring 0800 422 522 anytime you notice anything different with your water.

What do you think?

What do you think?

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Do you think a faster replacement programme for our old water pipes in Marton should be a priority in the Long Term Plan?

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Introducing Blair Jamieson – Strategy and Community Planning Manager

When I was younger I felt like a man trapped in a woman’s body. Then I was born! Firstly kia ora! For those who haven’t...

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Introducing Blair Jamieson – Strategy and Community Planning Manager

When I was younger I felt like a man trapped in a woman’s body. Then I was born!

Firstly kia ora! For those who haven’t met me yet; you will find that you will have to come to terms with a number of my issues; mainly Dad jokes, hunting chat, and ability to talk about freshwater fisheries and water quality for hours.

At the date of writing this article I have been working for Council for just over a week. Prior to moving down here and taking up employment I was living between Tauranga and Auckland, running my own freshwater fisheries, aquatic weed management, algal control and aquatic restoration company. Working in that space I developed and maintained a wide range of functional relationships with the likes of local and central government, farming operators, irrigation companies, waste water treatment plants, local trusts and private land owners. For those who may be interested this included project managing asset operations, leading engagements with local boards and councillors for environmental asset and biodiversity management, developing strategic documents for central government departments, designing-developing and managing local government contracts, and leading lobby group initiatives.

Being passionate about community engagement and environmental outcomes is what brought me here for this job. I sold my business for a lifestyle change, coupled with finishing up my Master’s degree in Business Strategy and Operations.

I am loving the area and spending less than 2-3 hours a day commuting in traffic has been a revelation! I am currently living in Wanganui East but would prefer to move closer to Marton if I can find a place that is ok with my Chesapeake Bay Retriever (named Danger).

For those who wish to make a new friend you will probably find that the best way to do this is to put me onto a good hunting spot or help me with access onto some deer rich blocks.

Anyway, this is probably enough from me. Hope to get to know you all over the years and please feel free to introduce yourselves.

ka kite ano koutou!

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September Highlights from Athol Sanson

The last few weeks have been very busy for the Parks and Reserves team. With the warmer days and longer daylight hours t...

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September Highlights from Athol Sanson

The last few weeks have been very busy for the Parks and Reserves team. With the warmer days and longer daylight hours the lawns and weeds are really taking off. I guess we all know it has been an incredibility wet 12 months and this is very frustrating for the Parks Team. We are seeing significant spring grass growth across the region with Taihape leading the growth rate.


Our Kowhai

I must say what a ripper of a flowering year our Kowhai are having. Everywhere you look you see bright yellow flowers with Tui enjoying the trees nectar. It certainly is the best flowering of this plant for many years.

Both Sophora godleyi and Sophora microphylla are the two main species growing in our region. Sophora microphylla is the main cultivated species and the Sophora godleyi is our naturally occurring species growing predominantly around Taihape.

Sophora godleyi, also known as Godley’s kōwhai, papa kōwhai or Rangitikei kowhai, grows naturally in the west of the North Island of New Zealand from Te Kuiti to the Manawatu. It is one of eight recognised species of Kowhai in New Zealand. It is named after Dr. Eric Godley, former head of the Department of Scientific and Industrial Research (DSIR) Botany Division.

I have always thought that the Kowhai flower should be our regional flower, after all the greatest population of this tree in the country lives in the Northern Rangitikei.

 


Drinking Fountains

A major highlight for me in the next few weeks will see the installation of drinking fountains to a number of our Parks. The first three fountains will be installed in Bulls Domain, Centennial Park and Taihape Memorial Park. These fountains will be wheelchair/mobility scooter friendly, have drink bottle fillers and a dog drinking bowl on the fountain at Bulls Domain.

The positioning of the fountains will be near playgrounds and other areas where children play.

Rangitikei, along with Whanganui and Ruapehu District Councils teamed up with the Whanganui District Health Board, Sport Whanganui and Healthy Families Whanganui, Rangitikei and Ruapehu from Te Oranganui to purchase and install a number of fountains. Funding was received from Four Regions Trust (formerly Powerco Wanganui Trust), Lion Foundation and Pub Charities, our thanks goes out to these organisations for helping to give the regions children these fountains.

In addition the Rangitikei District Council, through the parks partnership upgrade fund, made additional funding available to ensure these fountains could be purchased.


Marton Park Boer War Memorial

Over the last few months we have been investigating the restoration of the Boer War Memorial with the Marton RSA. This Marton Park memorial is one of about six known to exist in New Zealand and is dedicated to Trooper Hyde, the only Rangitikei District Boer war soldier to die in that war. It is also dedicated to commemorate peace and the coronation of the King.

An early Wanganui Herald article dated 9th September 1902 states “the Borough Council agreed to pay 150 pounds for the memorial”. The memorial is made from Melbourne Bluestone with a cast iron light stand. On close investigation the cast iron light stand is stamped on all sides at the base – Marton Post(?). We have looked into what or who Marton Post was, however at this stage we are unable to locate any reference to this person or business.

As Melbourne Bluestone is a very difficult material to restore we have been looking into solutions to restore this important local monument.

The Marton RSA are keen to see this restored as the Council are, however bluestone can be easily damaged by poor restoration practices. We will continue to look for a solution for the restoration of this important local monument.

Just one last thing, if you are lucky enough to walk around our town streets in the evenings you will smell a highly scented shrub that is filling the air with perfume at present. It our common Pittosporum tenuifolium – it really is nice.

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Innovative Design for Dogs

Council’s Health and Safety committee has recently developed and purchased a new prototype Animal Control vehicle which...

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Innovative Design for Dogs

Council’s Health and Safety committee has recently developed and purchased a new prototype Animal Control vehicle which will assist the Animal Control Officers in the field and meet the operational demands placed on all employers by WorkSafe New Zealand.

The vehicle has two aluminium animal crates that can be raised and lowered into and out of the vehicle by two electric vehicle winches, preventing back strains or injuries.

The vehicle also has two high powered long range spotlights that will allow the officers to search for, locate and remove animals on the road at night, that are potential traffic hazards such as cattle, sheep and horses.

The vehicle is also fitted with an amber flashing service light which will make them visible to other road users during the day and night.

The pod is a Gull Wing design and manufactured by StowTec, an engineering firm based in Palmerston North. The design and development process has taken over a year and the first vehicle was rolled out and introduced into service in September 2017. The pod will be in service for far longer than the old design due to its ability to be mounted on any make and model double cab frame.

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News Briefs

Creative Communities Scheme Opens 2 October The Creative Communities Scheme is a partnership between Council and Creativ...

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News Briefs


Creative Communities Scheme Opens 2 October

The Creative Communities Scheme is a partnership between Council and Creative New Zealand that helps to fund community-based arts activities in the Rangitikei District area. Applications close on Friday 27 October 2017. For full details and an application form please visit here.


Whats On? School Holiday Programme

The holidays are here once again and here is a whole heap of things that young people in Marton and surrounding areas can get involved in. There is something for everyone with everything from movies, to tacos, to music and sport. Check out here the programme on our website to see what you want to get involved in! Make sure to like our Facebook page to keep up to date with what’s happening and possible changes to What’s On?

Any questions or enquiries please email Gillian Bowler at Gillian.bowler@rangitikei.govt.nz or call 0275528594.


Beach Clean Up Efforts

In September the Feilding Surfcasting Club, with assistance from Rangitikei District Council, cleaned up the beach area from Scotts Ferry to just south of the Bombing Tower near Santoft Forest. About 29 black rubbish bags of plastic and general waste, along with several tyres, rope, netting, buckets, oil drums were collected and removed from the beach.

The club members who participated enjoyed the day and there was a consensus that this should be done twice a year, the next time being at the end of summer. The members were treated to the sight of a handful of fur seal pups on the beach as they worked.

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Ride the Bus!

Horizons Regional Council are responsible for providing bus services and the Rangitikei District is fortunate to have a...

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Ride the Bus!

Horizons Regional Council are responsible for providing bus services and the Rangitikei District is fortunate to have a bus service linking our communities and help us access other neighbouring cities.

To ensure we keep a bus service going we need to keep using these buses. Some reasons passengers use the bus are:

  • accessing medical appointments (health, dentist, eye examinations, osteopathic etc)
  • visiting family in hospital
  • accessing shops which aren’t available in our home towns or stores with a broader range
  • going to the movies, or just escaping for the day and getting away from day to day living.

Please if you want our bus service to continue “Ride the Bus”! For timetable and bus service information please visit Horizons website.

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Hunterville: shepherds’ shemozzle and all

Hunterville has a thriving population of 429 – give or take a few – for most of the year. But that grows to between 4,00...

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Hunterville: shepherds’ shemozzle and all

Hunterville has a thriving population of 429 – give or take a few – for most of the year. But that grows to between 4,000 – 5,000 for the great annual Shepherds Shemozzle!

The idea for this crazy race between shepherd and dog was dreamed up some years back, in one of the town’s pubs, by local identities Tony Theed, Richard Horrocks and Thomas Powell.

The dream was prompted by the Cardronna Shepherds’ Run down in the South Island and modified to suit the local surroundings.

Today the Shemozzle is a major event and forms part of the Hunterville Huntaway Festival – a festival and market held on the first Sunday after Labour Day with shepherd’s travelling from all over NZ to compete for the top prize. A family day filled with lots of entertainment and fun, the festival has something for all ages. The next Shemozzle is being held on Saturday, 28 October.

The Hunterville township is a small Rangitikei community on State Highway 1, 34km north of Bulls and 47 km south of Taihape. It was founded in 1884 on the banks of the Pōrewa Stream and is said to be named after the merchant and Member of Parliament, George Hunter, who placed a survey peg on the site where the settlement was to grow.

The railway arrived in 1887, and by 1896 the population was 546. Pastoral farming has always been important in the area and today Hunterville forms the main service centre for the farming community. Social services such as the post office, maternity hospital and banking have slowly declined over the years and some of these services are now provided from Marton, 25 km south of the town.

Fresh initiatives though, like the Shepherds Shemozzle, the Kiwiburn (the New Zealand Burning Man, held here since 2014), and the LGBTQ Vinegar Hill new years camping event are attracting more and more visitors to this rural gem on State Highway 1.

Poll up now!

Poll up now!

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Will you be attending the Hunterville Huntaway Festival this year?

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Caring for our wastewater system

Collecting and treating wastewater from our urban centres is just one of the activities that Council carries out on your...

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Caring for our wastewater system

Collecting and treating wastewater from our urban centres is just one of the activities that Council carries out on your behalf. The main purpose of this activity is to protect public health and the environment.

Approximately 9.2 cents out of every dollar of rates paid by ratepayers in our urban centres goes towards developing and maintaining this wastewater (sewage and greywater) service.

The better the system is working, the less time and money Council needs to spend on it. And to keep the system working efficiently there are some things we can all do to help.

Wet wipes, disposable and cloth nappies and feminine hygiene products all clog drains if they are put down the toilet. So please, wrap these and put them in your rubbish bag.

When cooking, avoid pouring left over fat down the sink. This too clogs the drains and valuable time and money is spent in unblocking them. Cooking fats can be put into the rubbish.

Old engine oil should not be poured down the drain (or the stormwater grate) as it harms the environment and is hard to treat in our wastewater system. Waste engine oil should be placed in a container and taken to the transfer station.

The same applies to household and other chemicals you wish to get rid of. Do not put these down the drain as they are hard to treat and they harm our environment. Instead take them to the transfer station in sealed containers.

If we all do our bit to keep our urban wastewater system functioning efficiently, we will save money and help protect the health of our communities.

For more information on Council’s wastewater activity here.

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Forward Works – September/October

The major works being undertaken during September/October are: Broadway – Follett/Signal Streets: this work includes rep...

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Forward Works – September/October

The major works being undertaken during September/October are:


Broadway – Follett/Signal Streets: this work includes replacing watermains, kerb and channel, resurfacing the footpath and installing ducting for Ultra Fast Broadband services. During construction there will be less car parking available and traffic will be slowed to a single lane with STOP/GO operations in place.


Jeffersons Line: pavement works will be undertaken, expect minor delays during October and November.


Mangatipona Road: widening and pavement works will be undertaken during September to November

Comments/Questions

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  1. Profile photo of Rangitikei DC
    Rangitikei DC

    Hi Murray – unfortunately there are no immediate plans to have a footpath on both sides of the road at Mill Street. This is the case for a number of streets in our District. Sorry I can’t give you better news. Carol

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  1. Rangitikei DC says:

    Hi Murray - unfortunately there are no immediate plans to have a footpath on both sides of the road at Mill Street. This is the case for a number of streets in our District. Sorry I can't give you better news. Carol

  2. Murray Sidaway says:

    Hi, When is Mill st going to get a footpath on both sides of the street???

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