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December Cover 2017

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December Cover 2017

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Mayors Christmas Message – the year that was…

Reflecting on 2017 I realise what a busy year it has been and how quickly this year has gone! The weather has been a yea...

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Mayors Christmas Message – the year that was…

Reflecting on 2017 I realise what a busy year it has been and how quickly this year has gone! The weather has been a year of challenges with one of the wettest I can remember for a long time, then in the last two months the driest!

There have been a number of highlights for me this year. In particular I have been impressed in witnessing how communities across our District have worked together. I look at how, for instance, Hunterville has completed a total renovation, to a magnificent standard, of their town hall, they combined with the community to do this and now provide national level events, like the shemozzle.

Another community initiative is the skateboard park in Marton. This idea came out of a youth submission to Council and has generated a fantastic $175,000 of funding, most of which is from external sources.

Other communities, including Taihape, Koitiata, Mangaweka and Ratana, all have their own community-driven projects underway. What great people we have in our District!

In 2018 I look forward to progressing the new Bulls multi-purpose complex to become a reality, this is still pending final confirmation from Council.

As a Council we produce our next 10 year plan. There are a number of large projects that need to be started including wastewater, stormwater, the Mangaweka Bridge and our town centre developments. These project will take a few years to be completed and will benefit our current and future generations. We also need to address our infrastructure, water quality, economic growth and earthquake prone buildings – it will be an exciting long term plan.

You will have an opportunity in the first half of 2018 to tell us what you think about our proposed plan. We do value your input.

Beth and I would like to wish everyone in the Rangitikei District a very happy Christmas and prosperous New Year. I look forward to meeting with many of you in 2018.

Andy

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Drinking fountains installed throughout Rangitikei

Rangitikei District Council is one of three councils in the region to take action to increase access to drinking water i...

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Drinking fountains installed throughout Rangitikei

Rangitikei District Council is one of three councils in the region to take action to increase access to drinking water in the community.

Rangitikei, along with Whanganui and Ruapehu District Councils, teamed up with the Whanganui District Health Board, Sport Whanganui and Healthy Families Whanganui Rangitīkei Ruapehu from Te Oranganui to successfully extend the water-only schools’ initiative beyond the school gates and into the community.

Three fountains are being installed in our District. The fountain at Centennial Park, Marton has already been installed, while fountains for the Bulls Domain and Taihape Memorial Park are not far behind. The fountains are hard to miss – a sturdy structure that is bright orange and all contain bottle fillers. The fountain in Bulls will also contain a dog bowl.

Mayor Andy Watson says “These drinking fountains will be a fantastic asset and great facility in our parks. This has been a good example of collaboration by working together to successfully achieve a great outcome. The fountain provides filtered water, which is needed on these hot summer days. Thanks to everyone who has been involved with this project.”

This project means seven fountains will be installed throughout the three council areas. The joint approach to increasing access to water in sport and recreation spaces was supported by funding from the Four Regions Trust. Rangitikei District Council contributed funds and also received funding support from Pub Charities and the Lion Foundation.

Chair of Four Regions Trust, Dot McKinnon says, “We are very supportive of the move to improve the health and well-being of our community in a sustainable way by ensuring that access to water isn’t a barrier to making a healthy choice.”

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Your pictures in Rangitikei Line…

Send in a picture or story Snapped a great shot of Rangitikei lately? Got an idea for a story you’d like to see publishe...

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Your pictures in Rangitikei Line…

Send in a picture or story

Snapped a great shot of Rangitikei lately? Got an idea for a story you’d like to see published? Know someone in the community who you think deserves a mention in Rangitikei Line?

We’d love to use your pics and story ideas in future issues of Rangitikei Line. You can send us your pics (jpegs) and story ideas by clicking on the button below.

Check out our cover, this could be your picture…

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Parks and Reserves Highlights by Athol Sanson

Welcome to the last Parks update of the year and what a busy year it has been. Since my last article we have seen little...

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Parks and Reserves Highlights by Athol Sanson

Welcome to the last Parks update of the year and what a busy year it has been.

Since my last article we have seen little rain in the lower part of the region and our parks, trees and gardens are starting to suffer. In contrast, the northern part of our region is seeing some amazing growth in lawns for this time of year.

The team, as always, have been very busy trying to keep on top of things during the build-up to Christmas and helping with many of the events we see on our parks at this time of year.

It’s also been great to see our first drinking fountain installed at Centennial Park with others to follow in the lead-up to Christmas at Memorial Park and Bulls Domain. Supplying fresh water to our park users has been one of our highlights this year.

This month I thought I would highlight a couple of major projects that the parks team will be working on next year. 2018 promises to be an exciting and challenging year ahead with some important projects to get underway.


Marton B and C Dams

During the summer of 2018 the harvesting of the pine trees around the dams will recommence. The harvesting of the pines has given us a great opportunity to look at the future use of this area and what we would like to see it look like in 20 years.

As the site covers an area of approximately 54ha and is a catchment for the dams it is important that whatever we do on site will benefit the future water quality that goes into the dams.

There is also a move to allow pubic access into this area in the future, this still has not be agreed by Council, but what a top area for an evening walk.

We have engaged Boffa Miskell to help develop a long term plan for this site. They are a leading New Zealand environmental planning and design consultancy who work with a wide range of local and public sector clients in the areas of planning, urban design, landscape planning, ecology, biosecurity, cultural heritage etc.

The plan is being develop in conjunction with the Council and will give us a blueprint to follow over the next 20 years, on this site.

Some of the items to be included in this plan include soft engineering solutions to improve water quality; planting of environmentally sensitive areas; walking track formation; mountain bike tracks; carparks; natural regeneration; enrichment plantings; pest plant management; pest management; and the costs to achieve all of this.

We will have a draft plan in place by Christmas so when logging recommences we know where the access and walking tracks will go.

As the large machinery is leaving the site they will repair the tracks they have been using to remove the logs. These areas will form the basis of future walking and access tracks.


Gretna Corner Realignment

We have been notified by the New Zealand Transport Agency that the realignment of State Highway 1 in Taihape will most likely happen next year.

While this isn’t a large project it is an important one for the Taihape community. Part of the project is a significant number of new gardens that will be installed to soften this corner. The local community understand the importance of this project and would like to see it as a gateway project into the town.

We have agreed to create gardens that represent Taihape and the wider environment. Naturally occurring Taihape plants will be used for the plantings while large Taihape boulders, called concretions, will be used as a feature in this area. This theme will then be used throughout the Taihape CBD in the coming years.

A concretion is a hard, compact mass of matter formed by the precipitation of mineral cement within the spaces between particles, and is found in sedimentary rock or soil. Concretions are often ovoid or spherical in shape, and can be seen in many areas around Taihape.

These rocks are greatly prized for landscaping and during summer you see truckloads being taken from Taihape to our cities.

On a personal note I would like to thank the Phantom for their kind gesture recently, whoever you are, it hit the spot and was very much appreciated.

To everyone else, from the Parks team, thank you for your support this year have a Merry Christmas and safe, happy holiday.

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Can’t see the footpath for the trees?

Has your garden grown like mad over the spring time? As the holiday time approaches and there are more people about, Cou...

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Can’t see the footpath for the trees?

Has your garden grown like mad over the spring time? As the holiday time approaches and there are more people about, Council is asking that you check overhanging vegetation hasn’t become a nuisance to others or a hazard to footpath users.

If you have a hedge, shrubs or trees that grow alongside a footpath, it’s up to you to make sure they don’t grow too far out, making it hard for others to pass or obscuring visibility around driveways.

Overhanging tree branches can be a major a problem. If you have a tree growing near a footpath the branches must be trimmed right back to your boundary. Trees overhanging footpaths become a problem in wet and frosty weather when the water weighs the branches down and they drip on footpath users. These conditions can also make the footpath slippery to walk on.

So lets clear the trees from the footpath. Take a walk around your property and check that no vegetation is obstructing the footpath and that it is easily passable for those in wheelchairs, on mobility scooters, or with prams.

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Utiku – from Asia Minor to the Rangitikei

Like many rural settlements in New Zealand, Utiku played an important role in establishing the Kiwi ethic of hard work a...

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Utiku – from Asia Minor to the Rangitikei

Like many rural settlements in New Zealand, Utiku played an important role in establishing the Kiwi ethic of hard work and ingenuity.

You may have noticed the sign on your left as you travel SH1, a few kilometres south of Taihape. The settlement has been there in the northern region of the Rangitikei District since it was first established back in 1893.

But in fact it has links way beyond that date, tracing its name back to Biblical times, to Troas in Asia Minor. In that place there was a young man, Eutychus – Utiku – who, while listening to the Apostle Paul preach, fell asleep and tumbled out the window and was presumed dead. But Paul brought him back to life and all was well.

Travel forward in time to the late 19th century, land in northern Rangitikei and come face to face with Maori Chief, Potaka.

He was an enterprising gentleman of some influence and wealth, leasing his lands to early settlers and establishing a sawmill in the area. Upon becoming a Christian and being baptised by missionaries, he choose for himself the name Eutychus – Utiku.

When he made available some land for settlement in 1893, the settlers eventually called the place Utiku – pronounced “Oo-tee-koo” – after Utiku Potaka. It was originally called Kaikora or Kaikoura.

The first Europen inhabitants of Utiku were workers employed on the construction of the Main Trunk Line – a major contributing factor in the establishment of many of the Rangitikei communities. In its heyday the settlement boasted a sawmill, two boarding houses and a few homesteads. A public hall was built by public subscription and volunteer community labour and was opened in 1896. And in the same year the Temperance Hotel opened for business also.

Remnants of this former life can be seen around the settlement. Some old houses are in sad need of repair while others have been restored. New houses have been built and today’s residents enjoy a rural environment not too far from ‘town’ – Taihape.

Today Utiku is probably most noted for the Wool Company which operates out of a modern plant in the settlement. The company has established a lively business, both online and in Utiku itself. It provides a range of eco friendly New Zealand made men’s, women’s & children’s merino and merino possum clothing. Garments include jerseys, jackets, thermals, lingerie, underwear and socks. An excellent range of hand knitting yarns is also produced by the company. Many of the yarns have their own history to tell as they are made from wools specific to various NZ high country sheep stations.

Source: NZETC. Victoria University.

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December 2017 Newsbriefs

Opening Hours for the Christmas/New Year Period 2017-2018 The Marton Office, Marton Library/Information Centre and Bulls...

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December 2017 Newsbriefs


Opening Hours for the Christmas/New Year Period 2017-2018

The Marton Office, Marton Library/Information Centre and Bulls Library will be open until noon Friday 22 December 2017.

The Marton Office will re-open at 8.00am on Wednesday 3 January 2018. During the holiday period, any service requests or problems can be directed to 0800 422 522 which is answered by our call centre 24 hours a day.

Please go to our website here for information on our other offices and our waste transfer station hours.

Have a great holiday season from everyone at the Rangitikei District Council.


Adoption of Section 16 Use of Heavy Vehicles – Traffic and Parking Bylaw 2017

Council recently adopted the Traffic and Parking Bylaw 2017 which was created to address persistent roading and traffic related issues. Section 16 relates to the use of heavy vehicles. It is to ensure the roading network is protected from damage caused by heavy vehicles which can put other road users at risk. Section 16 provides guidance to ensure consultation with relevant road users. However, where resolution is not reached, the road can be closed for a specified period after consideration of the economic impacts of the closure on potential users. This section has been adopted by Council and will come into force on 11 December 2017. Full details can be found here.


Earthquake-Prone Buildings – Council adopts “no priority areas”

Earthquake-prone building owners in CBD areas will have the longest time possible to strengthen their buildings. The system for identifying and managing earthquake-prone buildings changed on 1 July 2017.

Under the new system Council was required to consult with the community on areas where the strengthening of earthquake-prone buildings should occur faster (in half the time) due to their location in areas where there are high numbers of people or traffic – ‘priority areas’.

Council undertook consultation with the community during October 2017, with proposed priority areas in Bulls, Marton, Hunterville and Taihape. However, following feedback from the community Council decided to adopt ‘no priority areas’. This means that Council will have 5 years to identify potentially earthquake-prone buildings and building owners will have 15 years to strengthen buildings after being issued an earthquake-prone building notice.

Buildings (such as medical centres, police stations and schools) will still be considered as priority (and have reduced timeframes) under section 133AE of the Building (Earthquake-prone Buildings) Amendment Act.


Forward Works – December/January/February

  • Broadway – Follett/Signal Streets – work being done includes replacing water reticulation, kerbs, crossing and installing ducting for ultrafast broadband services. During construction parking will be limited and there is likely to be minor delays to traffic using Broadway (from October 2017 to February 2018)
  • Jeffersons Line – pavement work is being undertaken so expect minor delays during January and February 2018
  • Mangatipona Road – widening and pavement work is being undertaken so expect minor delays during December – January 2018
  • Galpins Road – work being done includes pavement work and extending a large culvert so expect minor delays during January and February

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